Six laws of relative dating

Following the death of an organism, any exchange ceases and the carbon 14, which is radioactive and therefore unstable, slowly begins to disintegrate at a known rate (half-life of 5730 years, ie, after this period only half of the total carbon 14 present at the time of death remains).

This approach helps to order events chronologically but it does not provide the absolute age of an object expressed in years.

Absolute dating methods mainly include radiocarbon dating, dendrochronology and thermoluminescence.

Stratigraphy Inspired by geology, stratigraphy uses the principle of the superposition of strata which suggests that, in a succession of undisturbed SOILS, the upper horizons are newer than the lower ones.

These methods usually analyze physicochemical transformation phenomena whose rate are known or can be estimated relatively well.

This is the only type of techniques that can help clarifying the actual age of an object.

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